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4.4: Concluding Paragraph

  • Page ID
    6614
  • The conclusion paragraph of an argumentative essay is an author’s last chance to create a good impression. Hence, it is important to restate the thesis statement at the beginning of the paragraph in order to remind the reader of your argument. Since it is at the end of the paper, the conclusion paragraph also should add a sense of closure and finality to the argument of the paper. It is important to re-emphasize the main idea without being repetitive or introducing an entirely new idea or subtopic. While you can end your conclusion paragraph by suggesting a topic for further research or investigation, do not make this question the focus of the paragraph. Thus, you should briefly and concisely reiterate the strongest arguments of the paper, reminding the reader of the validity of the thesis and bringing closure to your paper.

    Things to always do Things to never do
    • Stress the importance of the thesis.
    • Include a brief summary of the main idea.
    • Be concise.
    • Provide a sense of closure.
    • Rework your introduction or thesis statement.
    • Use overused phrases.
      Example:In summary...” or “In conclusion...
    • Announce what you have written in the body of the essay
      Example: “In this paper I have emphasized the importance of...”
    • Apologize.
      Example: “Although I do not have all the answers...”
    • Make absolute claims.
      Example: “This proves that the government should...”

    You may feel that the conclusion paragraph is redundant or unnecessary; however, do not forget that this is your last chance to explain the significance of your argument to your audience. Just as your body paragraphs strive to present the significance of each fact or quote you use, your conclusion paragraph should sum up the significance of your argument. Thus, you should consider making a bold statement in your concluding paragraph by evoking a vivid image, suggesting results or consequences related to your argument, or ending with a warning. Through using these components, you not only make your conclusion paragraph more exciting, but you also make your essay, and your argument, more important.

    Review Questions

    1. What are three of the main purposes of an introductory paragraph?
    2. What should you never do in an introductory paragraph?
    3. How should you refute counterpoints?
    4. What is the formula for a well-argued body paragraph?
    5. What should you include in a conclusion paragraph? What should never include in a conclusion paragraph?

    Points to Consider

    1. Write a persuasive paper arguing for or against a community service requirement that high school students must fulfill in order to graduate. If you are arguing for the requirement, be sure to specify what the requirement entails (i. e. how many hours or where it needs to be completed) in addition to supporting the use of the requirement. If you are arguing against the requirement, be sure to address counterpoints in addition to supporting your claims fully.
    2. Write a persuasive paper about the impact of media (such as video games, television, movies, or magazines) on high school aged (15-18) and junior high school aged (12-14) children. Should parents regulate both age groups’ access to these forms of media? Or, should only one group be monitored? If so, which? Do video games, television, magazines, etc affect one group more than the other? Use specific examples to support your ideas.