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2.1: Wellness Guidelines

  • Page ID
    2400
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    National Health Education Standards (NHES)

    • 1.12.2: Describe the interrelationships of emotional, intellectual, physical, and social health.

    Wellness Guidelines

    • Decrease sugary beverage consumption
    • Increase frequency of breakfast consumption
    • Increase fruit and vegetable consumption
    • Decrease fast food consumption
    • Increase frequency of physical activity
    • Decrease sedentary behavior
    • Increase conflict resolution skills
    • Decrease negative perception of challenges

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    • The wellness guidelines that will guide you through the Healthy Me Journey.

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    • Worksheets
    • Slide presentation

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    [As defined by: Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary, n.d.; USDA & HSS, 2015; HSS, 2008; Meeks, Heit, & Page, 2011]

    • Wellness: the quality or state of being healthy.
    • Guideline: Single or set of recommendations for how something should be done or how to work towards an overarching goal.
    • Rule: a statement that tells you what is or is not allowed in a particular game, situation, etc.
    • Dietary Guideline (DG): The Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasize the importance of creating a healthy eating pattern and physical activity to maintain health and reduce the risk of disease.
    • Sugar-sweetened beverages: Liquids that are sweetened with various forms of sugars that add calories including soda, fruit ades and fruit drinks, and sports and energy drinks.
    • Frequency: the rate at which something occurs or is repeated over a particular period of time.
    • Fast food: food that is prepared and served quickly.
    • Exercise: movement of the body that uses energy that is planned, structured, repetitive, and purposive.
    • Sedentary: characterized by much sitting and little physical exercise; inactive.
    • Conflict Resolution: Steps that can be taken to settle a disagreement in a responsible way.
    • Challenge: A difficult task or problem; something that is hard to do.

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    • Do Now
    • Wellness Guidelines
    • Behaviors & Outcomes
    • Exit Ticket

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    Do Now: What is a Guideline?

    • Set Up:
      • Write “Rule” and “Guideline” on the board or flip chart paper.
      • Hand out sticky notes to individuals or small groups of participants.
    • Share:
      • Who can tell me what the word “rule” means? It is a statement that tells you what is or is not allowed in a particular game, situation, etc.
      • What about the word “guideline”? It is a single or set of recommendations working towards an overarching goal.
      • What’s the difference? Rule has to be followed because there are consequences, but a guideline is more of a suggestion to help you achieve a goal.
      • What’s the point of having both rules and guidelines? Rules help provide structure and can keep us safe. Guidelines help provide direction and progress towards a goal.
    • Instruction:
      • Have participants individually or in think-pair-share groups write on two different colored sticky notes for one “Mad Minute” all the guidelines on one sticky note and all the rules on the second sticky note that they can think of at their school, community center or workplace.
      • Have each participant or one participant from each group walk up to the board and place each sticky note either under Rule or Guideline.
      • Review the results with the whole group.

    Good to Know: Wellness Guidelines
    Adapted from the USDA Dietary Guidelines (USDA & HSS, 2015).

    • Share:
      • Just like there are guidelines at your school, community center or workplace, there are also guidelines to be healthy or improve your wellness.
      • Wellness is the quality or state of being healthy.
      • The United States Department of Agriculture and Health and Human Service have developed dietary guidelines which emphasize the importance of creating a healthy eating pattern and engaging in regular physical activity to maintain health and reduce the risk of disease (USDA & HSS, 2015).
      • Let’s learn what these guidelines are.

    Guideline 1: Decrease sugary beverage consumption

    • Share:
      • What is a sugary or sugar-sweetened beverage? These include sugar-sweetened beverages which are liquids that are sweetened with various forms of sugars that add calories including soda, fruit drinks, and sports and energy drinks (USDA & HHS), 2015).
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • Clearer skin/Less Acne
        • More energy
        • Decreased risk of cavities
        • Achieve healthy weight
        • Memory boost
        • Increased concentration

    Guideline 2: Increase frequency of breakfast consumption

    • Share:
      • What does frequency mean? It is the rate at which something occurs or is repeated over a particular period of time.
      • How often should you eat breakfast? Every morning.
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • More energy
        • Increased concentration & attention
        • Won’t feel hungry
        • Not starving by lunch time
        • Less likely to pig out or binge later

    Guideline 3: Increase fruit and vegetable consumption

    • Share:
      • What are some examples of fruits and vegetables? Fruits: melons, berries, citrus, bananas, apples, figs, grapes, mangos, peaches, pears, plums, pineapple (USDA, n.d.). Vegetables: lettuces, squashes, bell pepper, carrots, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, beans and peas, potatoes, corn, yams (USDA, n.d.).
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • Feel full
        • Clearer skin / less acne
        • More energy, less sluggish
        • Change in taste buds
        • Getting your vitamins
        • Weight loss
        • Better mood
        • Increase in self-confidence & self esteem

    Guideline 4: Decrease fast food consumption

    • Share:
      • What does fast food mean? It is food that is prepared and served quickly.
      • What are some examples of fast food in your community? (Answers will vary).
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • Weight management
        • Less body fat
        • More energy, less sluggish
        • Increase in concentration
        • Clearer skin / less acne
        • Change in taste buds
        • Crave healthier foods

    Guideline 5: Increase frequency of physical activity

    • Share:
      • What does exercise mean? It is movement of the body that uses energy that is planned, structured, repetitive, and purposive (U.S Dept. Health and Human Services, 2012).
      • What are some examples of exercise? Walking, running, bicycle riding, swimming, sports, lifting weights, squats, dancing, yoga, etc.
      • What does physical activity mean? It is any body movement that works your muscles and requires more energy than resting. Walking, running, dancing, swimming, yoga, and gardening are a few examples of physical activity [NIH, n.d.].
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • Weight management
        • Gain muscle
        • Become physically stronger
        • Increase in self-esteem, self-confidence, and body image
        • More energy
        • Increase in concentration
        • Boosts happiness

    Guideline 6: Decrease sedentary behavior

    • Share:
      • o What does sedentary mean? It is characterized by much sitting and little physical exercise; inactive.
      • o If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • More energy
        • Boosts happiness
        • Weight management
        • Increase in self-esteem & self confidence
        • Feel productive and less lazy
        • More enthusiasm
    • Instruction:
      • Pass out or project the picture of the human body handout showcasing the brain, digestive system, muscular system and heart.
    • Share:
      • Now let’s look at the picture of the human body.
      • Which parts are addressed by these guidelines? Digestive system, muscular system, cardiovascular system.
      • Which parts could use more focus? “Heart” (emotions) and Brain. Wellness the quality or state of being healthy.
      • Are there different types of health? Yes, there are emotional, intellectual, physical, and social health (National Health Education Standards 1.12.2).
      • The next two guidelines focus more on the other types of health.

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    Guideline 7: Increase conflict resolution skills

    • Share:
      • What does conflict resolution mean? Steps that can be taken to settle a disagreement in a responsible way (Meeks, Heit, & Page, 2011, pg. 59).
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • o As participants share answers, record on the board, projector, or flip-chart paper.
        • Increase in self-esteem & self confidence
        • Increase in positive mood
        • Boosts happiness
        • Better problem-solving skills
        • Better coping skills
        • More patient
        • Stronger relationships

    Guideline 8: Decrease negative perception of challenges

    • Share:
      • What does challenge mean? A difficult task or problem; something that is hard to do.
      • How can challenges be positive in our lives?
      • They can be opportunities for growth.
      • If this guideline is followed, how could your health improve?
    • Instruction:
      • As participants share answers, record on the board, projector. or flip-chart paper.
        • Increase in self-esteem & self confidence
        • More open to new possibilities
        • Less fearful / afraid
        • More optimistic
        • Increase in positive mood
        • Decrease in stress levels
        • Boosts happiness

    Hands On: Behaviors & Negative Outcomes

    • Instruction:
      • Have participants complete a table of common health behaviors they have or see in others, the outcome or consequence of those behaviors and what a possible guideline or recommendation could be.
      • Participants can share out loud while facilitator records on the board or projector, or participants can complete it on their worksheets. Below are examples of answers.
    • Share:
      • We are going to brainstorm common health behaviors or habits we do and the outcomes or consequences of these behaviors.

    Behaviors

    Negative Outcomes

    Guidelines

    Eat fast food

    More body fat

    Decrease fast food consumption

    Drink soda

    Cavities

    Decrease sugary beverage consumption

    Watch too much TV

    Loneliness

    Decrease sedentary behavior

    Not sleeping enough

    Tired/ Affects memory

    Increase frequency of exercise

    Skip breakfast

    Lack of energy

    Increase breakfast consumption

    Don’t like vegetables

    Not enough nutrients

    Increase fruit and vegetable consumption

    On social media too much

    Not enough time

    Decrease sedentary behavior

    Fight with parents or significant other

    Anger

    Increase conflict resolution skills

    Feeling bullied or seeing bullying

    Lack of confidence

    Decrease negative perception of challenges

    • Share:
      • Having guidelines is really helpful when thinking about setting goals to improve your health.
      • They keep you focused and clear on what steps you need to take.
      • As we go through the curriculum, these eight guidelines will be a part of what we learn together, so at the end we can all achieve a specific health goal.
      • Looking at our table of behaviors and outcomes, who can share which guideline can help change which outcome?
      • For example, if you feel you eat too much fast food, which guideline should you follow? Guideline 4: Decrease frequency of fast food meals.

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    Exit Ticket:

    • Instruction:
      • Which do you think is the most challenging guideline for you to follow? Why?
      • Which guideline do you think will be the least challenging for you to follow?
      • Which guideline are you most excited about trying to follow? Why?
      • Have participants write on their worksheet or answer the following question(s) out loud.

    Bibliography


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    This lesson was created in partnership with Albert Einstein College of Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health with funding support by the National Institutes of Health NIDDK Grant R01DK097096.


    2.1: Wellness Guidelines is shared under a CK-12 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by CK-12 Foundation via source content that was edited to conform to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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